Educational games for kids: Clothespin Drop!

| Guest post by Education.com

Sometimes it can be difficult to find educational activities for children that are both fun and engaging. Sometimes your child will just want to play, not learn and play at the same time.

However an online website called Education.com offers a wide range of learning resources for children from preschool to primary school age. They offer fun and educational games, worksheets, stories, songs and activities like the one they’ve given me below.

I am more than happy to present to you “Clothespin Drop” – an educational game that will help preschool-aged children to learn about colours, sorting, pattern matching and counting. I have also added a couple of alternative suggestions, just look for the pink text below to see what they are. I haven’t changed much because it’s pretty good the way it is; a why-fix-it-if-it’s-not-broken kind of thing.

I’ve been wanting to give this game a try as it looks so cool but I haven’t gotten round to doing so with LO as work’s been busy (will be more so in the lead-up to summer!). I hope you like the activity below – if you decide to give it a try, let me know! Education.com may be providing me with more games and activities to offer you guys so keep an eye out for them as they’ll be exclusive to this blog. 🙂

If you fancy checking out there other games, visit their site:
www.education.com/resources/geometry/


The Greenwich Mummy | Educational Preschooler Activity: Clothespin Drop

Activity: Clothespin Drop!

Age: Preschool children

Encourage your preschooler to practice color recognition, counting and pattern matching with this fun and colorful clothespin drop game. This is a great way to get your child excited about learning the basics of math.

What You Need:

  • 5 Coffee cans (or Bisto gravy cans or anything else similar)
  • 5 Sheets of construction paper (red, orange, yellow, green and blue)
  • Clear tape
  • Scissors
  • 25 Wooden clothespins
  • Tempera paint* (red, orange, yellow, green, blue)
    *you can also DIY with some egg yolk and food colouring – cheap & cheerful
  • Markers
  • Paintbrushes
  • Stopwatch, or digital clock

What You Do:

  1. Help your child cut down each piece of construction paper to the size.
  2. Roll one color of paper around each can and tape it in place.
  3. Have your child tell you which color is on each can, while you write the name of the corresponding color onto the paper.
  4. Ask her to separate the clothespins into groups of 5.
  5. Have her paint each group of clothespins a different color. Let dry.
  6. Line up the cans on the floor in a row, in the center of a room.
  7. Scatter the clothespins, mixing the colors around in the cans.
  8. Encourage her to see how quickly she can separate the colors and put them in the corresponding can. Time her to see how quick she is!
  9. Dump them out again and mix them up. Tell her what her last time was and shave off a few seconds. Yell, “Go!” and have her re-sort them. Yell, “Stop!” at the end of the time allotted. Did her speed increase? The more she practices, the faster she’ll get!
  10. Practice creating patterns by timing her as she places clothespins in the colored tins in a specific order. As she continues, try to introduce more complex patterns.

Enjoy!

The Greenwich Mummy Blog by Manny Ngo

Gender Labelling: “Purple is for girls”… why hearing this really rattles my cages

The Greenwich Mummy Blog | Gender Labelling: Purple Is For Girls

purplehorse

I don’t usually write posts like this and usually leave the serious stuff to the better writes but I just wanted to share some of my thoughts and opinions on gender labelling.

Last week LO and his cousin Lils were playing with the Paw Patrol puzzle my friend Coco got LO for Chirstmas.

The next thing I heard come out of Lils’ mouth was:

“purple is for girls” 

I stopped my instagram surfing to look up and say in defense, “Purple is not just for girls. Purple is for everyone“.
Yes. I made sure I placed heavy emphasis on everyone. This is because it’s not the first time it’s happened.

There’s been other times when they’re playing together – happy as Larry – before my little nephew decides to tell LO that something he likes is “for girls” which really pisses me off. It’s something that I’m a little hypocritical about because I don’t have a problem with buying Baby Girl pink clothes and LO blue clothes when he was a baby BUT (and that’s a big but) I would not avoid ‘boyish’ colours for her and I certainly didn’t avoid ‘girly’ colours for LO. In fact, LO had a few pink, pastel and purple baby grows and shirts. Maybe not a whole pink outfit but he had touches of pinks etc in his little wardrobe. Continue reading “Gender Labelling: “Purple is for girls”… why hearing this really rattles my cages”

Learning Through Play Is A Wonderous Thing!

It’s simply fascinating how quickly children learn new things! LO is 19m and is already starting to know his colours, alphabet letters, numbers and shapes. He can’t put together a full sentence but if he knows what the thing is he’ll say it, he will point to the tiny plane in the sky among the clouds and will say “pane” or “air-pane” and occasionally make the sounds of the plane engine. (so cute!)

Daddy got him this toy from VTech called ‘Push & Ride Alphabet Train‘ a couple months back and LO was just riding on it, pressing all the colourful buttons and flipping the pages of the plastic built-in alphabet book. Only now he has been able to recognise what some of those pictures are and can tell me what they are. He still has trouble with putting the little alphabet blocks in their slots because they only go in a certain way and gets really frustrated when he can’t do it.

IMG_1727
LO trying to place the alphabet block into its rightful place

Sometimes it’s almost painful to watch as his tantrums can include throwing himself backwards onto the floor and banging his head on the laminate flooring which doesn’t look (or sound) good. I battle with myself all the time with thinking “should I run over to him and help him?” or should I just leave him to calm himself down from his tantrum? Most times, I just leave him to it… I hope that doesn’t sound like bad parenting! (It’s more like exhausted, drained-out parenting.)

I am very glad that we have this little train though, LO just does so much with it! He sits on it and rides it like a train. The train can be separated into two parts so LO can just push around the first part so it’s like a baby walker but we don’t do this because he’s over walkers now, he prefers trains and cars. 🙂 When his cousin is around they try to play with the blocks together, and there is a button that enables sound so you can switch it off when you want which is ideal when you have heap loads of work to do and need a bit of time to concentrate.

Loads of stores will stock this train including Tescos, probably Asda and Argos and of course all major toy stores. we got ours from our local Smyths store on sale for under £30.

NB. This post contains affiliate links

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