The importance of children being involved in household chores

The Greenwich Mummy Blog - Getting kids involved in household chores

There are so many things to teach your children. Whether it’s how to handle money, the importance of emotional intelligence or staying safe in public, parenting has to cover a lot ground. One important area that can sometimes be neglected is chores. While these may be just simple day-to-day tasks, ensuring that your child is both competent in them and understands their importance is absolutely vital.

In this article we give a few reasons why children should get involved in a range of household chores from learning how to defrost a freezer step by step to properly putting out the recycling. And for anyone out there whose children are less than excited about this idea, here are also a few top tips of how to get your kids enthusiastic about their domestic duties!

The Greenwich Mummy Blog - Getting kids involved with household chores
Everybody loves a mummy’s/daddy’s little helper!

Honing useful practical skills

The first reason why it’s important to get your little ones involved in household chores is so they learn useful practical skills. As a child you are learning everything from scratch so whatever you are doing will contribute to your development. For example, if a child learns how to defrost a freezer not only will they get specific skills in this task, but also start learning about food storage and safety.

Learning the importance of personal responsibility

As overstressed parents we often think we need to do everything for our kids, but anyone living in a home has a responsibility to contribute it. Involving your kids in day-to-day tasks will help them understand their responsibilities as members of the family. After doing a few chores they’ll probably appreciate all your work a whole lot more too.

Making them better housemates and partners

Finally, when children are brought up as hard-workers, helping to clean and tidy a house from a young age they make much better housemates and partners after leaving home. This is absolutely vital to the maintenance of friendships and relationships in early adulthood when they are likely to be sharing accommodation for a good few years. Teaching good habits early will pay dividends down the line.

The Greenwich Mummy Blog - Getting kids involved with household chores
It’s never too early to start the children with simple chores like cleaning and washing
The Greenwich Mummy Blog - Getting kids involved with household chores
Incentivise household tasks to make it more attractive for the kids

How do you get kids involved in household chores?

Incentivise the task: A controversial strategy, but a fail-safe one. If your child is reticent to help out, link their pocket money to their efforts. This will get the average youngster up and cleaning in no time.

Make it fun: Chores don’t have to be boring. If your kids aren’t keen to get involved, make the tasks fun. Turn vacuuming into a dance party, take the rubbish out while wearing funny wigs… Anything to get them enthused.

Give them responsibility: We all know how much more satisfying it is to do a task when we have actual responsibility for it. Give each of your children an area of the house for the week and ask them to take responsibility for all the chores. They will soon learn to take pride in their work.

Getting your kids involved in household chores is a great way to make them responsible, hard-working adults. Find ways to make it fun and engaging and in no time at all you’ll have a few busy worker bees helping with your daily tasks.


A guest post by freelance writer, Joana from Cleanipedia

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3 thoughts on “The importance of children being involved in household chores

  1. “Make it FUn” is indeed the Number 1 rule with kids. And as you rightly said, making them feel responsible. Easier at this time of year, as “Santa is watching” 😉

    Liked by 1 person

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